101 Golf Secrets

Golf Secrets 55 - 57: Social

Golf Digest

55 -- HOW TO LOSE 60 POUNDS AND MAKEOVER YOUR GAME
BY CRISTIE KERR
Because I was overweight, I had a lot of back problems and injuries. I also had trouble taking the club far enough back. I was totally committed to losing weight and looking better, and I knew it would help my golf game to have more strength, endurance and confidence. When I first decided to do it, I consulted with a nutritionist and a fitness coach. I got a blueprint for what to eat and how to work out. I cut my caloric intake to 1,500 a day for nearly two years. I worked out five or six days a week for at least 90 minutes. I'd do 30 minutes of cardio, a lot of stretching and up to an hour of weight training focusing on core stuff and golf movements. After a year or so, I could swing the club much better. I've won seven LPGA tournaments since. 


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56 -- HOW TO POLISH YOUR GOLF SHOES
BY MARTY HACKEL
Don't. The first thing you should do is clean, not polish, your shoes. A damp cloth with a little soapy water should do the trick, or you can clean with a clean shoe-polish applicator brush. After cleaning, wipe them dry with a soft cloth (an old towel is perfect). Let 'em dry.
Pre-season preparation should involve replacing your spikes. And change your laces. (How about the time you had five minutes to get to the tee and your laces snapped?)

Most shoes today have uppers that are waterproof, and periodically you can apply cream conditioner. Stay away from wax, which will prevent them from breathing. Unless you're interested in a position at the hospital, don't use that white liquid polish (only the shoe pro knows how to apply it).

Replace the sock liner with a new one or at least use some Borax powder liberally to counteract that stale smell. Invest in two pairs of golf shoes and rotate them. Purchase shoe trees and use them.


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57 -- HOW TO KNOW GREAT GOLF ART
BY TOPSY SIDEROWF
The best way to know great golf art is by studying fine art. That's how Archie Baird, the Scottish golf art historian, learned. "Knowing art is quite complicated, and you need to look for a long time," says Baird, a collector for the past 50 years. Bobby Hansen, an expert on golf memorabilia based in Pinehurst, N.C., suggests visiting the U.S. Golf Association Museum in Far Hills, N.J., and the British Golf Museum in St. Andrews to see the best examples.

Today's golf art market is flooded with good, bad and stolen artifacts, making it imperative to do business with a reputable dealer. For Hansen, it's Mort Olman, dean of American golf collectors. Check out his inventory at oldgolfshop.net.

The most interesting collections contain a variety of forms. Mixing old clubs and balls, engraved silver, ceramics and paintings creates "texture," according to Hansen. Bruno Lucchesi, an Italian-born sculptor known for his portrayal of the human figure, did the bronze pictured here in 1970.

Golf art was not always plentiful. Painting is a time-consuming process, and there wasn't much demand for the subject until the 20th century. Charles Lees worked on "The Golfers," considered the first great golf painting, for eight years. Completed in 1847, it depicts a match at St. Andrews and is a snapshot of golfers then. The original, worth millions, hangs in the Scottish National Portrait Gallery in Edinburgh. You can buy a reproduction for less than $100. Collecting is personal. Choose what pleases your eye if you're buying for pleasure. You'll never make a mistake if you stay in your price range.


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Images from top: Jonathan Carlson; Ben Van Hook; Kerry Brady