101 Golf Secrets

Golf Secrets 61 - 63: Equipment

Golf Digest

61 -- HOW TO GET THE THUMBS-UP ON YOUR GLOVE
BY TODD KERSTING, No. 1 Teacher in New Mexico
On a new glove, I like the Velcro to go on only halfway because the glove will stretch. Shorter fingers? Opt for a cadet size. Cabretta leather provides better feel, but costs more than synthetic, which is more durable. If you take off your glove and it looks like your hand is still in it, it's time to replace it.


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62 -- HOW TO CHOOSE A SET OF WEDGES
BY E. MICHAEL JOHNSON
Your wedges are sophisticated pieces of equipment, but you probably give them the same amount of attention you do a tee. What a mistake. "Most golfers have no idea how ill-fitted their wedges are to their game or course," says Bob Vokey, senior product development manager for Titleist. "And it's costing them strokes."

Most golfers think only about loft on their wedges. There are other variables: bounce angles, sole grinds, toe shapes, lie angles. Turf conditions also play a role. Watch for large gaps between clubs. A 44-degree pitching wedge, 56-degree sand wedge and nothing in between is a problem.

Vokey offers suggestions. Those who take big divots or play on lush courses require more bounce. If your swing is a sweeping motion or you play on firm terrain, less bounce is desirable. You might forget your 60-degree wedge. "The average player is better off with a 58-degree club," says Vokey. "You can do what you need with that, and it's easier to hit."


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63 -- HOW TO KNOW IF THAT OLD CLUB IS VALUABLE
BY E. MICHAEL JOHNSON
We've all heard the adage of one man's trash being another man's treasure. Keep that in mind as you're looking at your old golf clubs. They might be worth something. And in some cases, might be worth a lot. There are several sources you can turn to. Books such as Gilchrist's Guide to Golf Collectibles and The Antique Golf Collectibles Identification & Value Guide are excellent resources. But a number of factors combine to determine a club's value. "Price depends on scarcity and condition, but not always," says Rich Barbarics, whose website, clubsofdistinction.com, sells and consigns rare golf equipment. And what about those old Pings you've had resting in the corner of your basement? Go to pongman.com--an Arkansas-based website founded in 1990 by Dalton R. Daves that primarily deals in vintage Ping equipment. Here you'll find the value of that Ping Scottsdale Anser you nearly bent over your knee after that last four-putt to be somewhere between $1,500 (rough condition) to $4,000 (mint). But while a Scottsdale, especially one with the original grip, might be the ultimate discovery, don't get too excited when you find a club with a hickory shaft. "The market for stuff you hang on the wall has been soft for several years," says Barbarics, offering that most hickory-shafted clubs fetch as little as $15.


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Images from top: Jim Herity; Jim Herity