Food

Gwen Fowler

SOUTH CAROLINA INSIDER

 

The Charleston Nasty

Posted 4/2/2014 2:42:00 PM

A favorite dish at Hominy Grill in Charleston has a new name.

The Big Nasty is now The Charleston Nasty. Chef/Owner Robert Stehling’s yummy creation is a biscuit topped with a fried chicken breast, cheddar cheese and sausage gravy.

Earlier this year, Hominy Grill announced a contest to come up with a new name for The Big Nasty. According to several news reports, McAlister’s Deli had taken action to prevent Hominy Grill from using the name. McAlister’s has a roast beef sandwich on its menu called The Big Nasty.

Hominy Grill’s Facebook page said that more than 1,800 names were submitted for the biscuit during the contest, and some of those included Button Popper, Suicide by Biscuit, Juicy Jumbo, Big Gravy, Gravy in the Hen House, Cluckasm, Hot Chicken Dream and Motherclucker.
 
 

Chef Brock, FIG restaurant move up in the James Beard awards

Posted 3/18/2014 10:18:00 PM

A Charleston chef and a Charleston restaurant have moved up to the next step in the 2014 James Beard Foundation Awards.

Chef Sean Brock is one of six nominees for Chef of the Year, and FIG is one of five finalists for Outstanding Wine Program.

Brock is executive chef of McCrady’s in Charleston and Husk in Charleston and Nashville. He was one of five finalists for the national chef award in 2013, and this is the third straight year he was picked as a semifinalist. He was the Best Chef in the Southeast in 2010, a nominee for Best Chef in the Southeast in 2009 and nominated for Rising Star Chef in 2008 and 2009. Husk in Charleston was a semifinalist for best new restaurant in the 2011 competition.

FIG, owned by Chef Mike Lata and business partner Adam Nemirow, opened in 2003. They also own The Ordinary, which opened in late 2012. Lata was named Best Chef in the Southeast in 2009.

The nominees, announced March 18, narrowed down a list of semi-finalists announced in February. Other semi-finalists from Charleston included three chefs in the running for Best Chef in the Southeast: Jeremiah Bacon of The Macintosh, Kevin Johnson of The Grocery and Josh Keeler of Two Boroughs Larder. Also, McCrady’s was a semifinalist in the Outstanding Service category.

The final awards will come in New York City on May 5.
 
 

You can still get in on the Charleston Wine and Food Festival but hurry

Posted 3/3/2014 11:28:00 AM

The Charleston Wine and Food Festival is so close you can taste it!

That’s the message on the popular festival’s website, and it is close: It begins Thursday, March 6, but tickets are still available to some events. You can still go to one of the crowd favorites, Thursday’s Opening Night Party, the salute to Charleston chefs. More than 30 chefs will be there serving samples of one of their specialties. This year, the party returns to the main event tent in Marion Square.

You also still have time to get tickets for the Culinary Village and Grand Tasting Tent, where you can sample food, wines and spirits, see cooking demonstrations, and participate in book signings. The Culinary Village is open Friday, Saturday and Sunday.

Some of the Perfectly Paired dinners Friday night are still available, including those at Fish, Magnolia’s, Old Village Post House, OpalRed Drum, The Grocery and Tristan

The festival’s final event, Rigs, Pigs and Swigs at Mount Pleasant’s Memorial Waterfront Park, also is still available. County star Mark Cooke performs while some of the South’s best pitmasters show what they can do. Among the pitmasters are Aaron Siegel of Home Team BBQ, Jimmy Hagood of BlackJack Barbecue, Ricky Agius of Smoky Oak Taproom, Rodney Scott of Scott’s Bar-B-Que and Russ Cornette of Queology
 
 

Charleston chefs, restaurants in the running for James Beard awards

Posted 2/19/2014 9:57:00 PM

Two Charleston restaurants and four Charleston chefs are in the running for 2014 James Beard Foundation Awards

Sean Brock, executive chef of McCrady’s and Husk in Charleston and Nashville, is one of 20 semifinalists to be named Chef of the Year.

Three Charleston chefs are semifinalists for Best Chef in the Southeast. They are Jeremiah Bacon of The Macintosh, Kevin Johnson of The Grocery and Josh Keeler of Two Boroughs Larder

McCrady’s is a semifinalist in the Outstanding Service category, and FIG is a semifinalist for Outstanding Wine Program.

Brock is no stranger to the Beard awards program. This is the third straight year that he has been picked as a semifinalist for Outstanding Chef, and he was one of five finalists for the award in 2013. He was the Best Chef in the Southeast in 2010, a nominee for Best Chef in the Southeast in 2009 and nominated for Rising Star Chef in 2008 and 2009. Husk in Charleston was a semifinalist for best new restaurant in the 2011 competition.

This is the third year that Bacon has been a semifinalist for Best Chef in the Southeast, and the second year for Keeler. The Macintosh was one of 29 restaurants named semifinalists for Best New Restaurant in 2012.

Chef Mike Lata and business partner Adam Nemirow own FIG and The Ordinary, also in Charleston. Lata was Best Chef in the Southeast for 2009, and The Ordinary was a semifinalist for Best New Restaurant in 2013.

The Beard awards, considered one of the highest honors for professionals in the culinary industry, are sometimes called the Oscars of the food world.

From the semifinalists announced Feb. 19, the final nominations will be named on March 19. Nominations for the Book, Journalism, Broadcast, and Restaurant Design Awards also will be announced that day

The 2014 James Beard Awards will be held in New York City on May 2 and 5.
 
 

Crawling your way through Greenville’s restaurants

Posted 2/4/2014 4:28:00 PM

Two food bloggers are bringing a new event to Greenville March 24-26: the Greenville Small Plate Crawl

So far, 22 restaurants are participating in the crawl planned by Laura Huff of The Carolina Epicurean and Nichole Livengood of Gap Creek Gourmet. Livengood said Huff has worked with Crawls for five years in several North Carolina cities – Asheville, Hendersonville and Boone.

Here’s how Livengood says it works: You can go to the website to see each restaurant’s special Crawl menu, plan your route, print a passport, and then go enjoy the food. At each restaurant you visit, you’ll get your passport stamped. Turn your passport in at your last stop to be entered into drawings for prizes.

The website isn’t showing the menus yet, so stay tuned.

Huff writes about food and restaurants in North Carolina and South Carolina, and Livengood concentrates on the Upstate.